University of Kansas Field Station

KU Field Station hosts 2 special events over the weekend

Published on June 17, 2012 by Jennifer Delisle

Tags: Education, Native plants, Prairie, Special events


Bill Busby and Dean Kettle discuss management of the Anderson County Prairie Preserve
Bill Busby and Dean Kettle discuss management of the Anderson County Prairie Preserve
Research plots at the Medicinal Plant Garden, with butterfly milkweed in foreground
Research plots at the Medicinal Plant Garden, with butterfly milkweed in foreground
Neil Goss describes the natural dye garden
Neil Goss describes the natural dye garden

On Saturday, June 16, the KU Field Station hosted two special events at two locations in eastern Kansas.

The Anderson County Prairie Preserve near Welda is a tallgrass prairie preserve owned by The Nature Conservancy and managed by the Kansas Biological Survey as a unit of the KU Field Station. This high-quality tallgrass prairie supports populations of Mead’s milkweed, Greater Prairie-chicken and other rare species, and serves as an outdoor laboratory for research on prairie ecosystems. Staff members from the Biological Survey and the Conservancy led tours of the prairie and discussed the patch-burn grazing system used to manage the prairie for both biodiversity and livestock production. The tour was attended by nearly 45 participants including students enrolled in the summer KU field botany class. More information about The Nature Conservancy in Kansas.

The KU Native Medicinal Plant Research Garden consists of research plantings and demonstration garden; natural dye garden and KU Student Farm (both student projects); and a small garden planted by the adjacent Prairie Moon school. Kelly Kindscher, Kirsten Bosnak, and Steve Corbett led the tour attended by approximately 80 visitors, assisted by KU students Kim Scherman, Allyson Prue and Neil Goss. Tours of the garden are held in summer and fall each year. Visit the program's web site for a calendar of events.